Tryan Project

Tryan Project  - A streambank restoration project (Project) on lower Prickly Pear Creek just south of the Police Academy.  The Project involves three landowners where the banks of Prickly Pear Creek have little or no vegetation present with limited floodplain connectivity.  Eroding banks are due to grazing by livestock and stream incision.  

Below are before and after pictures of the Project.  Estimated cost is $300,000 for roughly 1 mile of stream.

The methods used for Prickly Pear Creek will be similar to a streambank restoration project completed in 2015 further upstream.  To address water quality problems, the methods used will consist of placement of tree revetments, rock, root wads, channel realignment, willow clump transplants, fencing, water gaps, and riparian seeding and plantings.  The project intends to improve fish habitat and streambank stability through vegetation enhancement by embedding large woody debris in the stream banks and reducing nonpoint source pollution through Best Management Practices (BMPs).  BMPs to be considered include water gaps, riparian fencing, grazing management plans, and revegetation of riparian areas.  

Materials used on the banks were rock, juniper trees and old logs and root wads.  

  

  

Tryan Project

Tryan Project  - A streambank restoration project (Project) on lower Prickly Pear Creek just south of the Police Academy.  The Project involves three landowners where the banks of Prickly Pear Creek have little or no vegetation present with limited floodplain connectivity.  Eroding banks are due to grazing by livestock and stream incision.  

Below are before and after pictures of the Project.  Estimated cost is $300,000 for roughly 1 mile of stream.

The methods used for Prickly Pear Creek will be similar to a streambank restoration project completed in 2015 further upstream.  To address water quality problems, the methods used will consist of placement of tree revetments, rock, root wads, channel realignment, willow clump transplants, fencing, water gaps, and riparian seeding and plantings.  The project intends to improve fish habitat and streambank stability through vegetation enhancement by embedding large woody debris in the stream banks and reducing nonpoint source pollution through Best Management Practices (BMPs).  BMPs to be considered include water gaps, riparian fencing, grazing management plans, and revegetation of riparian areas.  

Materials used on the banks were rock, juniper trees and old logs and root wads.