Governor's Directives

School Mask Directive
August 12- Incident End

Mask Directive
July 15- Incident End

Reopening the Big Sky: Phase 2
June 1 

Reopening the Big Sky: Phase 1
April 22 - May 31

Child-Care Requirements
April 1 - Incident End

Traveler Quarantine
March 30 - Incident End

Other Governor's Directives

  Health Officer Orders

Order of the Health Officer
September 4, Amendment 2

Order of the Health Officer
September 3, Amendment

Order of the Health Officer
July 15

Order of the Health Officer
July 7

Order of the Health Officer
June 24, Amendment 

Adoption of Governor's Directive
May 21, Phase Two

Adoption of Governor's Directive
April 22, Phase One 

Cancellation of Campground Closures
April 30

  Local News Releases

LCPH Board of Health Amends Sports Spectator Rules- September 3, 2020

Special Board of Health Meeting-September 3, 2020

2020 News Releases (LCPH)

  Educational Materials

Flyer:

Keep It In The Green (LCPH, St. Peter's Health, PureView Health Center)

How to Wear a Cloth Face Covering  (LCPH)

Poster: You've Got the Power to Stop COVID-19 (LCPH)

Postcard: Guidance for Visitors to County  (LCPH)

  Specific Guidance

Mask Guidance

Phase Two Reopening Guidance (LCPH)

Phase One Reopening Guidance (LCPH)

Confirmed and Possible Carriers
of COVID-19
  (CDC)

Detention Centers  (LCPH)

EMS Workers  (DPHHS)

Families  (CDC)

Group Living Situations (LCPH)

High-Risk Population  (CDC)

Long-Term Care Providers  (CDC)

Schools  (CDC)

  Presentations

LCPH Community Briefing, Oct 9
Zoom Recording- Password N0iS@!gP 

LCPH Community Briefing, Oct 2
Zoom Recording- Password Y1I.W9X4

LCPH Community Briefing, Sept 25
Zoom Recording- Password 11@7ceW+

LCPH Community Briefing, Sept 18
Zoom Recording- Password 5mwW#PL^

LCPH Community Briefing, Sept 11
Zoom Recording- Password tK&335r7

LCPH Community Briefing, Sept 4
Zoom Recording- Password k59RC=MN

LCPH Community Briefing, Aug 28
Zoom Recording-Password 12dLe.4e 

LCPH Community Briefing, Aug 21
Zoom Recording-Password: z2+.udx7

LCPH Community Briefing, Aug 14

LCPH Community Briefing, Aug 7

LCPH Community Briefing, July 31

LCPH Community Briefing, July 24

LCPH Community Briefing, July 17

LCPH Community Briefing, July 10

LCPH Community Briefing, June 26

LCPH Community Briefing, June 19

LCPH Community Briefing, June 12

LCPH Community Briefing, June 5

LCPH Community Briefing. May 29

LCPH Community Briefing, May 22

LCPH Community Briefing, May 15

LCPH Community Briefing, May 8

LCPH Community Briefing, May 1

LCPH Community Briefing, April 24

LCPH Community Briefing, April 17

LCPH Community Briefing, April 10

LCPH Community Briefing, April 3

LCPH Community Briefing, March 27

LCPH Community Briefing, March 20

LCPH Community Briefing, March 13

LCPH Presentation, March 5: Preparing for Coronavirus for Medical Providers

  Websites

World Health Organization  (WHO)

Centers for Disease Control  (CDC)

Governor's Coronavirus Task Force

Montana Dept. of Public Health
and Human Services

Coronavirus Myth Busters (WHO)

 

 

COVID-19 in Lewis and Clark County

Lewis and Clark Public Health (LCPH) has activated its emergency response team and is working daily to respond to COVID-19 in Lewis and Clark County. We are also working closely with local health-care providers to detect and investigate cases of the disease.

COVID-19 is a respiratory disease that originated in China in late 2019 and has since spread throughout the world. The disease can have mild to severe symptoms, including fever, cough, and trouble breathing. It can also be fatal, especially among people age 65 and older and people with serious, existing health problems, like heart disease, diabetes, or lung disease.

 
 Global/US 
Case
 Map
  Montana/County
Case Map
  By the
Numbers
  Incident Action Plan 

 

What You Can Do to Avoid COVID-19

Distance Yourself from Others

"Social distancing" is one of the most effective strategies you can use to protect yourself and others from COVID-19. Social distancing means avoiding crowded places and keeping a distance of at least 6 feet between yourself and others.

Other examples of social distancing are:

  • Working from home instead of at the office
  • Closing schools or switching to online classes
  • Visiting loved ones by electronic devices instead of in person
  • Cancelling or postponing conferences and large meetings

With COVID-19, the goal of social distancing is to slow down the spread of the disease in order to reduce the chance of infection among high-risk populations and to reduce the burden on health-care systems and workers. Now is not the time for hugs and handshakes.

History indicates that these measures work. A 2007 study found that, during the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic, cities that used several interventions at an early phase of the pandemic—like closing schools and banning public gatherings—had significantly lower death rates.

Practice Good Personal Hygiene

Everyday precautions that can help prevent the spread of flu and other germs are also effective against the virus that causes COVID-19.

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after using the bathroom, before eating, and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing;
  • If soap and water aren’t available, use a hand sanitizer containing at least 60 percent alcohol;
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick;
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth;
  • Stay home when you’re sick;
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue, and then throw the tissue in the trash; and
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated.  EPA-Approved Disinfectants

Use Appropriate Face Coverings

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended that the general public wear cloth face coverings – not surgical masks or N-95 respirators – in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (like grocery stores and pharmacies).

But the CDC warns that face coverings should not give anyone a false sense of security! Social distancing and hand washing are still very important protective measures and should be continued.

You can use bandanas or scarves to cover your face. If you want to make a homemade face mask, there are lots of patterns and instructions out there. Here are 2 that are recommended by reliable sources:

CDC: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/cloth-face-cover.html

St. Peter’s Health:  https://www.sphealth.org/sites/default/files/making%20a%20basic%20mask%204.6..20.pdf?1586198571129

Surgical masks and N-95 respirators should be reserved for people who show symptoms of COVID-19 and for health workers and others who are taking care of patients at home. People who are in direct contact with people who are infected must change their masks repeatedly.

Here's how to wear a cloth face covering

Here's where to get face coverings

If You Think You Have COVID-19

Symptoms of COVID-19 include a fever over 100 degrees F, cough, and difficulty breathing. If you have mild symptoms, stay home if possible and contact your medical provider by phone for guidance. Your provider will make sure you don’t expose others in the office or hospital setting. He or she will also work with public health professionals to determine if you need to be tested.

If you have severe symptoms, such as difficulty breathing, seek care immediately. Let the 9-1-1 dispatcher know that you might have COVID-19.

Older patients and people who have underlying medical conditions or compromised immune systems should contact their physician early in the course of even mild illness.  

Testing Locations 

 

Starting Oct 2, 2020

COVID-19 Community Briefing Zoom Webinar Call
Please join our Public Only Zoom Community Briefing Webinar call every Friday at 8:30 a.m.  Pass code 447277

 

 

Questions or concerns? Call the state hotline at 1-888-333-0461
or email publichealth@lccountymt.gov

For complaints about any of the Governor's COVID-19 directives within Lewis and Clark County, call 406-457-8886

 

COVID-19 in Lewis and Clark County

Lewis and Clark Public Health (LCPH) has activated its emergency response team and is working daily to respond to COVID-19 in Lewis and Clark County. We are also working closely with local health-care providers to detect and investigate cases of the disease.

COVID-19 is a respiratory disease that originated in China in late 2019 and has since spread throughout the world. The disease can have mild to severe symptoms, including fever, cough, and trouble breathing. It can also be fatal, especially among people age 65 and older and people with serious, existing health problems, like heart disease, diabetes, or lung disease.

 
 Global/US 
Case
 Map
  Montana/County
Case Map
  By the
Numbers
  Incident Action Plan 

 

What You Can Do to Avoid COVID-19

Distance Yourself from Others

"Social distancing" is one of the most effective strategies you can use to protect yourself and others from COVID-19. Social distancing means avoiding crowded places and keeping a distance of at least 6 feet between yourself and others.

Other examples of social distancing are:

  • Working from home instead of at the office
  • Closing schools or switching to online classes
  • Visiting loved ones by electronic devices instead of in person
  • Cancelling or postponing conferences and large meetings

With COVID-19, the goal of social distancing is to slow down the spread of the disease in order to reduce the chance of infection among high-risk populations and to reduce the burden on health-care systems and workers. Now is not the time for hugs and handshakes.

History indicates that these measures work. A 2007 study found that, during the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic, cities that used several interventions at an early phase of the pandemic—like closing schools and banning public gatherings—had significantly lower death rates.

Practice Good Personal Hygiene

Everyday precautions that can help prevent the spread of flu and other germs are also effective against the virus that causes COVID-19.

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after using the bathroom, before eating, and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing;
  • If soap and water aren’t available, use a hand sanitizer containing at least 60 percent alcohol;
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick;
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth;
  • Stay home when you’re sick;
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue, and then throw the tissue in the trash; and
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated.  EPA-Approved Disinfectants

Use Appropriate Face Coverings

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended that the general public wear cloth face coverings – not surgical masks or N-95 respirators – in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (like grocery stores and pharmacies).

But the CDC warns that face coverings should not give anyone a false sense of security! Social distancing and hand washing are still very important protective measures and should be continued.

You can use bandanas or scarves to cover your face. If you want to make a homemade face mask, there are lots of patterns and instructions out there. Here are 2 that are recommended by reliable sources:

CDC: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/cloth-face-cover.html

St. Peter’s Health:  https://www.sphealth.org/sites/default/files/making%20a%20basic%20mask%204.6..20.pdf?1586198571129

Surgical masks and N-95 respirators should be reserved for people who show symptoms of COVID-19 and for health workers and others who are taking care of patients at home. People who are in direct contact with people who are infected must change their masks repeatedly.

Here's how to wear a cloth face covering

Here's where to get face coverings

If You Think You Have COVID-19

Symptoms of COVID-19 include a fever over 100 degrees F, cough, and difficulty breathing. If you have mild symptoms, stay home if possible and contact your medical provider by phone for guidance. Your provider will make sure you don’t expose others in the office or hospital setting. He or she will also work with public health professionals to determine if you need to be tested.

If you have severe symptoms, such as difficulty breathing, seek care immediately. Let the 9-1-1 dispatcher know that you might have COVID-19.

Older patients and people who have underlying medical conditions or compromised immune systems should contact their physician early in the course of even mild illness.  

Testing Locations 

 

Starting Oct 2, 2020

COVID-19 Community Briefing Zoom Webinar Call
Please join our Public Only Zoom Community Briefing Webinar call every Friday at 8:30 a.m.  Pass code 447277

 

 

Questions or concerns? Call the state hotline at 1-888-333-0461
or email publichealth@lccountymt.gov

For complaints about any of the Governor's COVID-19 directives within Lewis and Clark County, call 406-457-8886